Any Other Business


MERVYN THE MONKEY mops up



Well, another month passes and Pools are still second in the league. And for once their points-per-game ratio also puts them second too, so a top-three finish looks more feasible than it has since that fantastic start to the season petered out.

We Poolies of course will believe it when we see it, having been let down so often before. And with this season having shown how things can go awry when key players are missing, it will be crucial to avoid losing the likes of not only Featherstone, Liddle, Armstrong and Oates, but also most of the regular players as well, whether to injury or suspension.



This picture was found on the back of a clipping about something else entirely. (apologies for the creases - it's been folded for a long time!)

It shows Brian Clough and Peter Taylor making a presentation to Pools' then-chairman, John Curry, on the occasion of their leaving to manage Derby County in 1967.

The item being presented was a table lighter. I wonder if anyone still makes table lighters, or have they gone the way of VHS video recorders and non-cordless kettles?



I don't know if others have found the same, but as someone who tends to stand close to the pitch at the Vic (and you don't have an alternative at some of the other National League stadiums), watching the streamed matches has been a revelation.

Camera positions are usually up high, often higher than any viewpoint available to spectators, giving a better overall view of the play, and especially of the midfield passing. Here you get a better view of the interplay between the midfield players, making, for example, the perfectly-placed long pass more obvious and makes one wonder if that's a contributory factor in why some players' skills aren't always appreciated.

Perhaps the answer is that the Pools-type passing game needs to be viewed from a high vantage point from where you can better see the options each player has when making his pass, whereas the size of gaps available for passes can't so easily be judged from the side or rear.

When next I'm in the Vic I think I'll stand a bit further back - and up!




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